Yemen: Ceasefire Agreement Remains, But More Measures Needed TOU

Yemen: Ceasefire Agreement Remains, But More Measures Needed
 TOU

Yemen: Ceasefire Agreement Remains, But More Measures Needed

On Tuesday, two senior UN officials briefed the Security Council ambassadors on the latest developments, who also spoke about the implications of the agreement reached between the Yemeni government and the Houthi rebels.

The agreement has recently been extended for another two months. UN officials, however, noted the challenges ahead.

Hans Grundberg, the UN special envoy to Yemen, praised the two sides on the Yemeni side, saying, “It has been almost two and a half months since the ceasefire agreement came into force in Yemen, which is extraordinary in this war, and That was unimaginable earlier this year. ”

Decreased fighting

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A meeting between representatives of the Yemeni government and the Ansar Allah faction, which is also attended by UN envoys from Yemen.

The Special Envoy said that since the ceasefire agreement was first announced in April, no air strikes have been confirmed in Yemen, nor has there been any cross-border attack from within the country. There has also been a significant reduction in civilian casualties.

However, casualties from landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) have increased, as people are moving to areas contaminated with frontline explosives that were previously inaccessible to the general public.

Although fighting has declined overall, the United Nations continues to receive reports of alleged human rights abuses by both sides, including shelling, drone strikes, reconnaissance and reconnaissance flights, and the deployment of military forces.

There have also been reports of some armed clashes, particularly in the Ma’rib, Taiz, and Hudaydah governorates.

A military coordination committee will meet every month to consider current issues, including representatives of both sides and coalition forces supporting the Yemeni government.

Air flights and fuel

Commercial flights from Sanaa, the capital of Yemen, have been closed for almost six years, now to Jordan’s Amman and Egypt’s Cairo. Fuel is also flowing smoothly through the port city of Hudaydah.

An extraordinary opportunity

Special Representative Hans Grundberg told the Security Council that in the coming weeks, they would move forward on two fronts. They will work closely with the parties concerned for the full implementation of the Ceasefire Agreement, and for a more lasting solution to the country’s deteriorating economy and security issues. He also underlined the need for continued Security Council support.

He said, “Of course, it will be up to the parties concerned to take advantage of this opportunity to negotiate in good faith and make any necessary adjustments for the good of the whole country.” This ceasefire agreement provides an extraordinary opportunity to move forward in the direction of peace, which should not be missed. ”

Growing human needs

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Gada Altahir Mudawi, Deputy Director of Operations Affairs at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OHCHA).
United Nations

Gada Altahir Mudawi, Deputy Director of Operations Affairs at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OHCHA).

Gada Altahir Mudavi, a senior official at the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs – OCHA, also urged the Security Council to consider the extremely dangerous situation in a country where approximately 19 million people are facing starvation, including About one lakh 60 thousand people are standing on the brink of famine.

He said, “Yemen’s humanitarian crisis remains as serious today as it was before the ceasefire agreement came into force. In fact, the crisis could soon get worse. If this is allowed to happen then the progress achieved through the ceasefire agreement may be reversed and the prospects for future progress may be dimmed. ”

The people of Yemen are being crushed by skyrocketing food prices, which are rising as a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.
Currency devaluation has also exacerbated the situation, while there are wide gaps in water, health and education services.

More than 4 million Yemenis have been forced to flee their homes, of which about 7,000 have become homeless in the last two months alone.

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