Amazon CEO Jassi says he wants to improve warehouse security TOU

Amazon CEO Jassi says he wants to improve warehouse security

 TOU

Amazon CEO Jassi says he wants to improve warehouse security

In this December 5, 2019, file photo, AWS CEO Andy Jassi discusses a new venture with the NFL during AWS re: Invent 2019 in Las Vegas. In his first letter to Amazon shareholders, Jassi offered to protect the wages and benefits that the company offers to its warehouse workers, while promising to improve injury rates within the facility. Jassi, who took over as CEO from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos last July, wrote that he has been researching the company, creating a list of the top 100 “employee experience pain points” and trying to address them. In a report released this week by a coalition of four unions, Amazon accounted for 33% of all U.S. warehouse workers by 2021, but is responsible for 49% of all injuries in the industry. Credit: Isaac Brecken / AB Images for NFL, file

In his first letter to Amazon shareholders, CEO Andy Jassi offered to protect the wages and benefits that the company offers to its warehouse workers, while at the same time promising to improve injury rates within the facility.

Jassi, who took over as CEO from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos last July, wrote that the company has been reviewing and creating a list of the top 100 “employee experience pain points” and trying to address them.

“We are interested in further improving security in our complementary network, focusing on reducing strains, sprains, falls and recurrent stress injuries,” he wrote.

The company is set to face two shareholder votes next month with workplace injuries. One calls for an independent audit of the conditions and treatment of its warehouse workers, and the other seeks to assess whether Amazon’s policies lead to racial or gender differences in its workplace injury rates. The retailer argued against both plans, but U.S. bond regulators disagreed and allowed the resolutions to be upheld.

The Strategic Organizing Center, a coalition of four unions, found in a report released this week that Amazon employs 33% of all American warehouse workers by 2021, but is responsible for 49% of all industry injuries. During an interview with CNBC on Thursday morning, Jassie dismissed the report, saying it was “inaccurate.”

He also wrote Partner letter Company injuries can sometimes be misunderstood, claiming that there are operational jobs that fit both the “warehouse” and “courier and delivery” categories.

Jassie, who provided his own data, acknowledged that the company’s warehouse injury rates were “slightly higher than average” compared to other warehouses, but were lower than average compared to Amazon’s courier and delivery counterparts.

“It makes us average compared to peers, but we don’t seek to be average,” Jassie wrote. “We want to be the best in the class.”

Trade union organizers in Staten Island, New York, and Bessemer, Alabama, have mobilized workers to point out the company’s injury rates. The new Amazon trade union, which won the union election in Staten Island earlier this month, is now seeking to negotiate with the retailer for a union deal. But Amazon has rejected those efforts and is seeking re-election.

Jesse did not mention union motivation in his letter, but said the company was offering “strong” benefits and had increased hourly wages over the past few years. When asked about the success of the union during the interview, he said that it is the will of the employees that they want to join a union but it is better not to do so.

He argued that the unions would slow the transition and that it was better for workers to have direct contact with their managers, urging the company not to unionize its employees before the union elections.


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                                        Amazon's injury rate rose 20% last year, a new report shows
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